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1 week ago

Shoreline Fishing

Great article written by Bill Varney!

Thank you Been There Caught That for posting.

#shorelinefishing #surffishing #lugworms #shorelinelugworms #perchcandy #surfperch #corbina #bestsurfbaitA lot of us have questions about surf fishing with worms. What kind? How do you rig them? How long do they live? Bill Varney, Surf Fisher Extraordinaire, posted this helpful article. He has graciously allowed us to repost it.

SURF FISHING WITH WORMS

With more than seven hundred varieties of marine worms it’s no wonder they work so well for fishing in the surf. Most of us are familiar with bloodworms because they have been sold in tackle shops since the 1920’s and used for bait all along the California coast.
A few years ago when a shortage of bloodworms caused by bad weather and over harvesting hit the market their price skyrocketed to about $30.00 per dozen. As a result, a new worm was introduced to surf fishing and the Pacific Lugworm became the newest bait on the market. Worms are segmented annelids and work great for surfperch, yellowfin croaker, spotfin croaker and corbina.
Bloodworms are harvested in estuaries in New England where a much healthier supply is now on the market, while lugworms are an aquaculture product of Korea. Both worms are flown into Los Angeles each week and after inspection are distributed to local tackle shops.
Bloodworms (Glycera dibranchiata) are different from lugworms (Abarenicola pacifica) in several ways. Bloodworms are generally larger and have a stronger casing. They stay intact longer on the hook and can be used to catch several fish without changing the bait. Lugworms are a bit less pliable than bloodworms but still work great. Lugworms are very hardy and generally cost about half as much as their counterpart.
The technique used to hook worms is definitely an art and takes a bit of practice. When it comes to blood or lugworms, when hooked, it is important that the bait lay on the hook as flat as possible. I like to use a long shank #2 sproat or bait holder hook for worms because the hook’s long shank makes it easier to “thread” the worm up the hook and line. Using a light rod and reel the Carolina Rig is my favorite rigging for fishing worms.
The first step when hooking worms is to entice the worm to extend its proboscis (mouth) from its tube lining. Inside the worm you’ll find a set of four pinchers (two on lugworms). They appear as if they are tiny hooked claws. The worm uses these to catch its prey and to dig holes in the sand. On larger worms these claws can get your attention as they clamp onto your skin with a sharp pinch. The jaws are connected to poison glands that produce a neurotoxin that they use to subdue their prey.
To avoid getting pinched I take my hemostats (i.e. stainless pliers) and pinch the worm’s end to expose the claws or rub the business end of the worm against my jacket to open its mouth. The fresher the worm the faster and more pronounced the pincers and mouth will be.
To get the worm in a position to place on the hook I pinch (softly) the “neck” (below the mouth/pinchers) between my thumb and forefinger. Holding the worm firmly, insert the sharp hook end into the mouth (in the center of the pinchers). Slowly and carefully, trying not to puncture the worm casing, feed the worm up the hook. Pull the worm onto the hook until you reach the hook eye and mono knot. Firmly grasp the mouth and pull it over the hook eye. At this point the worm can also be slipped up the line. Leaving a one and one-half inch end, puncture the hook through the worm casing. Be sure to pull the hook past the barb so it sets well and will hold the worm in place as you cast.
Try not to get too much of the “blood” on you and definitely avoid getting it into your eyes. The more fluid that remains inside the worm, the more effective it will be at attracting fish.
After a few bites, check your worm and see if you need to slide a new tail end down again. You can do this by retracting the hook from the worm casing, pulling the worm back off the hook, about one and one-half inch and then puncturing it back through the side casing. This again leaves a small tail dangling for presentation.
Be sure to pull the business end of the hook through to the barb.
With some practice you’ll be able to catch more than one fish per bait. Leaving the bait in one piece not only makes it easier to use but also gives the worm a more realistic presentation and catches more fish. If you find you are not getting bites put on a fresh one. Worms are only effective bait when alive. Once dead, discard them.
You will find lugworms and bloodworms at many coastal tackle shops. Once purchased they last about one to two weeks if kept in a refrigerator. Check your bait periodically and discard those that have died. Worms do not freeze and when dead emit an order that repels fish.


Photos courtesy Bill Varney
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1 week ago

Shoreline Fishing

Fishing with lugwormsJust another day at the beach in Newport. Fishing with 6lb test, using the Carolina rig and lug worms. Fishing near where sand and rock meets is almost alway... ... See MoreSee Less

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2 weeks ago

Shoreline Fishing

Shoreline lugworms conquering multiple difference species.

Who can ID all these fishes?

Happy weekend and tight lines!

#shorelinefishing #surffishing #miami #eastcoast #lugworms #bestbait
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1 month ago

Shoreline Fishing

Here are the winners for our #lugwormchallenge

1) Logan Her
2) Thanh Ho
3) Sergio Hernandez

Winners were picked using random name selector. Please message us for your winnings. Congratulations!!
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3 months ago

Shoreline Fishing

Bill Varnay - lugworm 101 ... See MoreSee Less

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